Sunday, October 17, 2010

Changes in lipoprotein(a), oxidized phospholipids, and LDL subclasses with a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet — The Journal of Lipid Research

Changes in lipoprotein(a), oxidized phospholipids, and LDL subclasses with a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet — The Journal of Lipid Research

Changes in lipoprotein(a), oxidized phospholipids, and LDL subclasses with a low-fat high-carbohydrate diet

1. Nastaran Faghihnia*,
2. Sotirios Tsimikas†,
3. Elizabeth R. Miller†,
4. Joseph L. Witztum† and
5. Ronald M. Krauss*,1

+ Author Affiliations

1.
*Department of Atherosclerosis Research, Children's Hospital Oakland Research Institute, Oakland, CA
2.
†Department of Medicine,† University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA

Abstract

Low-fat diets have been shown to increase plasma concentrations of lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)], a preferential lipoprotein carrier of oxidized phospholipids (OxPLs) in plasma, as well as small dense LDL particles. We sought to determine whether increases in plasma Lp(a) induced by a low-fat high-carbohydrate (LFHC) diet are related to changes in OxPL and LDL subclasses. We studied 63 healthy subjects after 4 weeks of consuming, in random order, a high-fat low-carbohydrate (HFLC) diet and a LFHC diet. Plasma concentrations of Lp(a) (P < 0.01), OxPL/apolipoprotein (apo)B (P < 0.005), and OxPL-apo(a) (P < 0.05) were significantly higher on the LFHC diet compared with the HFLC diet whereas LDL peak particle size was significantly smaller (P < 0.0001). Diet-induced changes in Lp(a) were strongly correlated with changes in OxPL/apoB (P < 0.0001). The increases in plasma Lp(a) levels after the LFHC diet were also correlated with decreases in medium LDL particles (P < 0.01) and increases in very small LDL particles (P < 0.05). These results demonstrate that induction of increased levels of Lp(a) by an LFHC diet is associated with increases in OxPLs and with changes in LDL subclass distribution that may reflect altered metabolism of Lp(a) particles.

Comment- Pretty straight up study, and low carb wins big time. Lipoprotein a, apo B, and oxidizzed phospolipids are all important markers of heart disease, and all of them got worse on low fat, better on low carb.

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